Oct 112018
 

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Sep 092018
 

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Sep 022018
 

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Jul 212018
 

© AAP-SG – Own work, CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Jul 062018
 

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Jun 292018
 

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Jun 042018
 

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May 242018
 

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May 132018
 

A couple from the, Manor of St. George.

Manor St. George or St. George’s Manor,

was a large tract of land purchased by William “Tangier” Smith in the 17th century on Long Island, in central Suffolk County, New York. Parts of the original parcel, which was approximately 64,000 acres (260 km2) of land, are preserved in bits and pieces: 127 acres (0.51 km²) and the main house and buildings are called the Manor of St. George and located in Shirley; 35 acres (0.14 km²) and another house are called the Longwood Estate and located in Ridge; and 35 acres (0.14 km²) became part of the William Floyd Estate.

The Museum Manor of St. George is in a testamentary trust set up underneath the last will and testament of the late Eugenie A.T. Smith. The management of the manor rest with the trustees. The purpose of the private trust is to promote the Smith family history dating back to 1683. The Longwood Estate (sometimes called the Smith Estate) is maintained by the Town of Brookhaven, and the Floyd Estate is maintained by the National Park Service. The hamlet of Manorville also derives its name from Manor St. George.

Manor St. George originally stretched from Carman’s River (then called the Connecticut River) in the west to the edge of Southampton Town in the east, and from the Atlantic Ocean in the south to around present-day New York State Route 25 in the north.


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May 102018
 

© AAP-SG – Own work, CC BY-NC-ND 4.0