May 132018
 

A couple from the, Manor of St. George.

Manor St. George or St. George’s Manor,

was a large tract of land purchased by William “Tangier” Smith in the 17th century on Long Island, in central Suffolk County, New York. Parts of the original parcel, which was approximately 64,000 acres (260 km2) of land, are preserved in bits and pieces: 127 acres (0.51 km²) and the main house and buildings are called the Manor of St. George and located in Shirley; 35 acres (0.14 km²) and another house are called the Longwood Estate and located in Ridge; and 35 acres (0.14 km²) became part of the William Floyd Estate.

The Museum Manor of St. George is in a testamentary trust set up underneath the last will and testament of the late Eugenie A.T. Smith. The management of the manor rest with the trustees. The purpose of the private trust is to promote the Smith family history dating back to 1683. The Longwood Estate (sometimes called the Smith Estate) is maintained by the Town of Brookhaven, and the Floyd Estate is maintained by the National Park Service. The hamlet of Manorville also derives its name from Manor St. George.

Manor St. George originally stretched from Carman’s River (then called the Connecticut River) in the west to the edge of Southampton Town in the east, and from the Atlantic Ocean in the south to around present-day New York State Route 25 in the north.


© Artistic Ave Productions

By Artistic Ave Productions – Own work, – CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Feb 152018
 

  • Albrecht Dürer
  • Together they have been viewed as representing the three spheres of activity recognized in medieval times: Knight, Death, and the Devil belongs to the moral sphere and the “active life”; Melencolia I represents the intellectual; and St. Jerome in His Study the theological and contemplative life.
Sep 112017
 

© Artistic Ave Productions

By Artistic Ave Productions – Own work, – CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Aug 232017
 
Aug 232017
 
May 022017
 

 


© Artistic Ave Productions

By Artistic Ave Productions – Own work, – CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Apr 192017
 

Engraving of Kilroy on the WWII Memorial in Washington DC

Apr 182017
 

 

Jan 302017
 

Bran Castle

  • The Teutonic Knights – “Ordo domus Mariae Sanctae Theutonicorum Hierosolimitanorum” – a catholic religious order formed in Palestine during the late twelfth century by German crusaders, received Țara Bârsei (“Terra Borza” or “Burzenland” – a country named after the Cuman tribe of Burci) from King Andrew II of Hungary. The purpose of this gift was to establish the Teutons in the area and to defend the Southeastern border of Transylvania from the Cumans and the Pechenegs.
  • The Teutons erected a fortress in Bran (a Turkish name meaning “gate”), before they were driven away from the area in 1226.
Jan 302017
 

Cetatea Poenari

  • Poenari Castle ([po.eˈnarʲ]), also known as Poenari Citadel (Cetatea Poenari in Romanian), is a ruined castle in Romania, notable for its connection to Vlad III the Impaler. Access to the citadel is made by climbing the 1,480 concrete stairs.